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09 June 2009

For When the Numbers Don't Speak for Themselves


Imagine
a typical reader
looking over your shoulder as you write,
and reacting to your words.
Try to keep this reader interested,
intrigued,
but not baffled.
Try and make
a continuous chain of written thought. Do not
lurch
from
one topic to
another without adequate introduction or
ration-
ale. ‘Discontinuity’ and jumps
in
ex-
po-
si-
tion
are off-putting to your
readers. Hence clear
organisation is very helpful, to the
reader and to the
writer. Unless it is very short,
divide your work
into sections, each dealing
with a CLEARLY IDENTIFIED SUBDIVISION of your topic.
Begin by saying what the project is about;

do not give the impression of grinding to a halt because you can not think of anything more to say.





By Kat(i)e, 6 June 2009. Writing advice in a final year undergraduate project handbook put together by Bristol University Maths Department. Kat(i)e used ellipsis to represent omitted text.